Foodborne Burden

Foodborne Burden

A recent report from the CDC analyzed the sources of foodborne illness in the US from 1998-2008. Cited as one of the most comprehensive analyses of attributing illness to food, the results of this report might surprise you – namely because of the role that fresh produce plays. The researcher found that produce accounted for … Read more

Fiber Tracking Made Fun

Fiber Tracking Made Fun

Despite its grainy past, folks are finally embracing fiber. This magical component of the diet has documented health benefits for the prevention and treatment of heart disease, diabetes, certain types of cancer, weight management, and others. The Institute of Medicine, in their report on pages 339-422, recommends that men age 50 or younger eat 38 … Read more

Finally: a Fiber Report Card

Finally: a Fiber Report Card

Nutrition screeners are a great way to obtain a quick snapshot of the adequacy of a particular person’s nutrient or dietary intake. They can be used in many settings: for weight loss, education, as part of a larger nutrition assessment, or just for fun to figure out how you stack up to recommended intake levels. … Read more

Fake Fiber Doesn’t Keep you Full

Fake Fiber Doesn’t Keep you Full

A new study published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recently took a look at the effect of functional fibers on satiety. Evidence is amassing about the effect of increased fiber intake on satiety (the feeling of fullness). But whether or not these effects are realized from functional (added) fibers as … Read more

Bread’s the Biggest Culprit in US Salt Intake

Bread’s the Biggest Culprit in US Salt Intake

A new report out from the CDC says that breads and rolls are the number one source of salt in the US diet. These findings are surprising because they indicate that it’s the amount of breads and rolls we eat – and not necessarily the sodium content per serving – that is pushing US salt … Read more

White Bread Wiggles Out of Trouble

White Bread Wiggles Out of Trouble

A new study published in the online edition of Nutrition Reviews concludes that eating up to 50% of your grains from refined grain sources does not significantly increase disease risk. The review article, entitled “Evaluation of the evidence between consumption of refined grains and health outcomes” looked at 135 articles published on the topic from … Read more

Fiberticula – Not So Fast….

Fiberticula – Not So Fast….

A new study to be published in the February issue of the journal Gastroenterology appears to show that the formerly friendly relationship between fiber and diverticular disease prevention has soured. The article – which doesn’t beat around the bush with its austere title, “A High-Fiber Diet Does Not Protect Against Asymptomatic Diverticulosis” looked at 2,104 … Read more

The Jewel of the Mediterranean

The Jewel of the Mediterranean

You hear about it all the time: the Mediterranean Diet. With an emphasis on plants, lean proteins, olive oil, nuts and seeds, the Mediterranean Diet has been linked to lower rates of cardiovascular disease and longer lifespans. But how do you incorporate the Mediterranean principles into your Western lifestyle? A new book has set out … Read more

Kids Now Need Cholesterol Screening

Kids Now Need Cholesterol Screening

The American Academy of Pediatrics recently endorsed the new National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute’s (NHLBI) recommendation to begin screening children for high cholesterol as early as age 9. While the importance of early detection of cardiovascular disease – the number one killer of Americans – cannot be understated, these recommendations do not come without … Read more

Potato Eaters Put on Pounds

Potato Eaters Put on Pounds

A recently published study in the New England Journal of Medicine found that those who eat more potatoes weigh more than those who don’t. On average, an extra serving of potatoes per day when compared to the baseline study population’s intake equated to a 1.69 pound weight gain over four years. Potato chip eaters weighed … Read more